We cannot solve the technology problem with more technology.
Internet and wireless mobile devices (WMDs) are tools for a specific purpose. Use the tool for that purpose, put it back and move on.
Read on to learn how.

Let’s Go Shopping!

WMDs have replaced the wristwatch, alarm clock, calendar, camera, flashlight, letters, books, radio, newspaper, magazines, calculator, map and compass. No wonder WMDs are impossible to put down!

We recommend taking a few applications out of the WMDs and investing in the following items. Remember, simple is better.

  1. Alarm Clock
  2. Wristwatch (bonus if it also shows the date!)
  3. Calendar (hung in a central place in the home, e.g., kitchen)
  4. Wall clock (hung in a central place in the home, e.g., living room)
  5. Newspaper subscription (daily/weekly)
  6. Landline phone service (for emergencies and to address FOMO)
  7. Calculator (if used frequently)
  8. An assortment of sticky notes and pens distributed throughout the home (to scribble thoughts/things-to-do instead of reaching for the WMD every few minutes)

Let’s put these items to use!

Why? Well…because every time you pick your WMD to check the date/time, there is a deluge of notifications on the home screen…you get distracted by them and start addressing each of them. By the end, you forget why you had even picked up the WMD in the first place.

Remember the first step of the habit-loop: DELETE THE CUE!

Any other items that you have found useful and feel we should include here?

Phreedom Rules at Home

Please note that these are just suggestions. Families must develop personalized media use plans to enable Life-Technology Balance.

  1. Avoid installing screens in the bedroom.
  2. Designate a WMD charging station outside the bedroom and keep the devices there overnight. Did you buy that alarm clock yet?
  3. Prefer not to use WMD at least for an hour after waking up (duration might vary based on morning routine).
  4. WMDs should not be a part of the table settings at meal.
  5. Replace screentime with greentime at least 30-90 minutes daily. All WMDs should go in a designated basket during greentime.
  6. Discover non-digital leisure activities (e.g., boardgames) and hobbies.
  7. Supervise young children when they are engaged with WMDs.
  8. Parents set the standards for children to follow.

What rules do you find useful in your daily lives?